Research Progress… road bump

Looking for advice,

At this point in the process, I have been continuing to look for business cases that discuss the launch in ENT2.0 for the purpose of my content analysis.  Part of the difficulty I have seen is the raw cases don’t really exist in press of any sorts – they have all be “pre-synthesized” by the authors such that an attempt toward coding seemed like I was coding the RESEARCHER/AUTHORS words and not the actual participants words.  I had not worried too much about this, because I had requested a journal 3 weeks ago from the Purdue Library that touted 70 cases of businesses….that I felt confident I could garner text from…

That was until I read this note from the LIBRARY yesterday!!

—–Original Message—–
From: Purdue Libraries Interlibrary Loan [mailto:ill@purdue.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 2:30 PM
To: XXXXXXXX
Subject: Automated Interlibrary Loan Notification

Dear XXXXXXX,

A request you have placed:

Journal or Conference Title:  International journal of knowledge and learning.

Volume: 6  Issue:  4  Month:    Year: 2008

Pages:  595 – 612

Title: Enterprise 2.0: what models are emerging? The results from a 70 case-based research

Author: Mariano Corso A1, Antonella Martini A2, Andrea Pesoli A3

Year of Publication:

TN: 1015475

has been cancelled by the interlibrary loan staff for the following reason:   We could not fill your request by your deadline.

I am not someone that puts all their eggs in one basket, but I have to say I had never been let down by the univ. Library.  After picking myself up off the floor, I need to regroup and come up with a new plan to get some data, and get it fast.  I feel I have lost serious time; time I don’t really know how to get back.

Would love anyone’s advice…  meanwhile, I am thinking #occupyPULibray

The Organizing Power of Social Media

For this week’s class we read a variety of articles; from academic papers to pieces from Vanity Fair and everything in between.  The common thread between these disparate writing forms was the notion of the organizing power of social media.  While this was not the first time I had heard or read about social media being viewed as a change agent in enabling social change, there were a couple items that struck me as unique from a couple of these articles.

What is Occupy Wall Street – Washington Post :  “We are all leaders”… REALLY??

In the WP article, Social media was positioned as an enabler of participatory democracy; a vehicle for allowing a wide variety of voices/themes to unify for a cause, verses promotion of shouting over each other for their own selfish purpose. Further, this alternative media is represented as a virtual welcome mat for any would be causes looking for a means to join forces based on “principles of unity”; anti-authoritarian, anti-discrimination.

Up to the point that this article used the women’s rights movement of an example of a similar and “leaderless protest”, I was hanging with them.  Have they not heard of Gloria Steinem, renowned New York feminist and journalist who was the feminist spokesperson of the 60’s?  What about Carol Hanisch, considered a “radical feminist”, a member of New York’s Redstockings group?  She protested Miss American and certainly represented the women’s rights protests as a leader when she came up with the saying “The Personal is Political”.  We can all have voices… we cannot all be Leaders, just like we can all play in a football game, but that does not mean we are all winners when the clock ticks down to zero.

Social media does make for democratic prioritization of issues.  For me however, whether you are using social media or not, a leader to unify the issues is important, and if the cause is really a cause – a clear leader or set of leaders will emerge.  Social media provides the megaphone to the masses for these leaders, and the lack of a leader results in just a bunch of people shouting in the streets & Tweeting on line to themselves.

 Here Comes Everybody – Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky’s article was based on a sad story forced into the light of day by the organizing power of social media.  With a tone of irony, I say THANK GOD for social media in this case.  In this article, the words that resonated for me were…

Social tools do not create social /collective action, they merely remove the existing obstacles.

The old obstacles highlighted in this article were 1) the locality of information and 2) built in barriers preventing group sharing of information.  The notion that social media takes local information global seemed intuitive to me, but how that “globalness” results in totally re-constructing, the borders of organizations had completely eluded me.  Even more compelling was the idea that this restructuring cannot be contained by the “rules of the local”, because they no longer have any relevance or jurisdiction.  A curious quandary for organization rule makers and for sure – another opportunity for our WebLawyer.

Finally, the barrier breaking nature of social media to increase group sharing seems almost Sci-Fi when you think back to the days of clipping paper articles, making copies, and waiting for US Postal correspondence; frankly, in reflection, I had nearly forgotten just how long that cycle took.  In addition, back then when someone sent you a Xeroxed article on some topic, you always wondered if it was real – or if someone had doctored something up using the copier.  I suppose the same is true for the web and social media– you can make anything up and create WebPages out of thin air in minutes, but now so many people have access to the same set of information that the fakers are found out almost as quickly as they release their bogus info.

The bottom line for social media and the power to organize:  SM is a tool for informing, sharing and growing a cause; it breaks old paradigms but also creates a few new ones.  It is not a panacea but does allow us an opportunity to rethink boundaries of all kinds, including geographic, social, and political ones.